Rooting the Samsung Galaxy Tab A SM-P350 tablet running on the Marshmallow updates is what you need to do to become the root user. The root user is the person who is in complete control over what gets installed on the tablet and what gets uninstalled. With mobile operating systems, the things you can install and uninstalls are apps. While that might not sound appealing, it’s important to understand that there are applications out there that can do just about anything—from changing the features and adding some new ones to making the battery last longer or enhancing your gaming experience, it’s all available with root access.

If you were buying a new computer that runs on a Windows operating system, you would already be the equivalent of the root user on the operating system. Windows identifies this as the administrator, and it is the admin who chooses what can get deleted and can always run any of the programs that they want. Android decided not to allow people to have such robust permissions and that is why you need to do a little work to become the root user instead.

Samsung Galaxy Tab A

There can often be a couple of ways to become the root user over the Android operating system that runs on the Samsung Galaxy Tab A tablets. One of them is by installing a custom recovery image on the tablet and then installing the SuperSU from the custom recovery image itself. Doing that is different than installing the SuperSu from the Google Play Store and the custom recovery image is required to have it correctly installed and enabled. The other way—and the way that we are featuring in this guide—is by using the CF-Auto-Root tool also made by Chainfire. The CF-Auto-Root tool is a one-click rooting method which prides itself on being incredibly quick and easy to use, but there is also one more important difference that is often overlooked by Android enthusiasts who are sometimes too quick to poke fun. The difference is that CF-Auto-Root does not require you to install a custom recovery nor does it require you to keep a custom recovery installed. That means you can use CF-Auto-Root to become the root user and use all of the root apps and you can still have the stock recovery—something that even Chainfire himself is promoting a lot these days as even he is moving away from the custom recovery images.

Details We Should Know

  • Chainfire had the MMB29M.P350XXU1BPF1 firmware build number on the Samsung Galaxy Tab A SM-P350 tablet when the version of the CF-Auto-Root tool found in this guide was developed. That does not mean that you need to be running on the same firmware build number as him just because he shows the firmware build number he was running. Chainfire shows that information so you can use it as an indicator only.
  • There is a CF-Auto-Root tool thread setup over at the XDA-Developers web forum that you can leave messages on if you want to request new devices to get a rooting method with the CF-Auto-Root tool. That same forum is also great for anyone who is finding a current version of the CF-Auto-Root tool not working and needs updating. Sometimes new versions of Android stop the CF-Auto-Root tool from working, and you know this when your smartphone or tablet does not boot after flashing it.
  • You need to have the Samsung Galaxy Tab A tablet that comes with the SM-P350 model number to use this guide. Any of the other model numbers get bricked if you flash the version of the CF-Auto-Root tool that is in this guide.
  • You need to have a computer that runs on a version of the Windows operating system if you are going to be able to use the Odin flashing tool that is available in this guide.

Files We Need

  • Download the CF-Auto-Root tool for the Samsung Galaxy Tab A SM-P350 tablet running Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow.
  • Download the Samsung USB Drivers for the Windows operating system running on the computer.

Rooting the Samsung Galaxy Tab A SM-P350 smartphone running on Android 6.0.1 using CF-Auto-Root

  1. Unlock the Developer Options on the Samsung Galaxy Tab A SM-P350 tablet so you can use the development options that are available to you on the menu.
  2. Enable the USB Debugging Mode on the Samsung Galaxy Tab A SM-P350 tablet so you can make changes to the Android software that is running on your device.
  3. Install the Samsung USB Drivers on the computer so when you run the Odin flashing tool and connect the tablet to the computer with the USB cable it is then able to detect the device.
  4. Extract the rooting file to the Downloads folder, so you can use the flashable version of the rooting file and run the Odin flashing tool itself.
  5. Boot the Samsung Galaxy Tab A SM-P350 into the Download Mode and then connect it to the computer with the USB cable that issued for charging.
  6. Run the Odin flashing tool executable file that is available from the Downloads folder so that the user interface opens, and then check that you do see a blue or yellow ID: COM port color lighting up which is there to let you know the Samsung USB Drivers are working and the device is detected.
  7. Do not make changes from the default settings that you get from the Odin user interface Options tab or else you risk losing data.
  8. Click on the AP button from the Odin user interface and then browse through to the Downloads folder and upload the Md5 rooting file that is there.
  9. Click on the Start button from the Odin user interface and the flashing begins.
  10. Read the text that is rolling down the Samsung Galaxy Tab A display that is there to let you know what it happening with the rooting process and what to expect.
  11. Wait until you get a green box with the pass message inside of it from the Odin user interface before disconnecting from the computer.

In conclusion, that is how to root the Samsung Galaxy Tab A SM-P350 tablets running on the Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow software updates. The rooting guide using the systemless root version of the CF-Auto-Root tool that is developed for rooting the Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow updates. It was said that Android 7.0 Nougat would have the same rooting method, but it seems like that it will not be at this point. There isn’t much to learn about the systemless root version of the CF-Auto-Root tool apart from the fact that it no longer runs through the system partition and hence how it gets its name. One of the notable differences is that each time you choose to take a hard reset you end up unrooting the device just as if you were to click on the full unroot button that is available from within the SuperSU menu.