Whether you believe that brands like Samsung should have the right to clamp you down in their environment or not, rooting the Android operating system is possible, and it is likely here to stay thanks to the added ability to gives us over our software. The Android smartphones we are given from Samsung are usually given to us with the bootloaders locked and the operating systems locked. A locked bootloader usually means that we cannot install any custom recovery or custom firmware. A locked operating system usually means we cannot install any apps that require root access to the internal system to run.

It’s the latter case that we will be addressing here today and once you have root the Samsung smartphone yo are officially able to start installing any of the apps that are available from the Google Play Store. The Google Play Store allows these applications to be available from the Play Store because they do not disagree with the apps. Google also believes that people should have the option to choose to unlock an operating system should they please and that is why these apps are not banned. The only difference is that you cannot be installing any of these root apps unless your device is in fact rooted by using something like the CF-Auto-Root tool that we are using here today.

Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge

The firmware builds number that the rooting tool in this guide is based on comes with the MMB29K.G9250ZCU2DPC3 string. You do not need to be running that MMB29K.G9250ZCU2DPC3 firmware on your Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge smartphone. The build number is given by the developer of the rooting app so you can use it as a guideline if you ever find your device is not booting the image. According to the developer, some Samsung devices will not boot old images and by looking up the build number given above you can find out a rough time period that the rooting method was made.

Now that we are aware that people root the Samsung Galaxy S6 Ege smartphones to install more apps let’s take a look at a few that are worthwhile for you to install. The first app I always recommend for people to install is the Titanium Backup app, and if you have read many of my guides before you will already know all about that app, so I will skip it and try for something that might teach you something instead. One of the next in line for people that I think can make use of on the Samsung smartphones is the Terminal Emulator app. Just like when we run commands from a command line to root sometimes from a computer suing the Android Debug Bridge, our phones can instantly run the Terminal Emulator app with root access. The Terminal Emulator gives you guys the chance to run full Linux terminal emulation, UTF-8 compatible text for foreign language support, launcher shortcuts and much more.

Next on the list of go-to apps to install on your rooted Android operating system would be the System App Remover application. As the name tells you already, this is going to help remove the system apps on your operating system either put there by the manufacturer (Samsung) or your phone carrier network. According to news breaking today, Apple is delivering the iOS 10 update with unlocked bootloaders which allows people to remove the system apps. That is the main talking point about having iOS software with the bootloader unlocked. At this stage it is not confirmed whether that will be the case when it is officially released because of what we see today is the beta one versions of the iOS 10 release. But if so, it would be great news for Android fans out there who were wondering whether what we do is ethically right or wrong. If a company like Apple can deliver a bootloader that can be purposefully unlocked so we can remove any system app that we do not want, then that would almost sign seal and provide the validity of rooting the Android operating system and how it is not wrong at all to do.

The first app I always recommend for people to install is the Titanium Backup app, and if you have read many of my guides before you will already know all about that app, so I will skip it and try for something that might teach you something instead. One of the next in line for people that I think can make use of on the Samsung smartphones is the Terminal Emulator app. Just like when we run commands from a command line to root sometimes from a computer suing the Android Debug Bridge, our phones can instantly run the Terminal Emulator app with root access. The Terminal Emulator gives you guys the chance to run full Linux terminal emulation, UTF-8 compatible text for foreign language support, launcher shortcuts and much more.

Files You Need

  • Download the new CF-Auto-Root tool for the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge SM-G950 when it is running on the Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow updates from here.
  • Download the Samsung USB Drivers for the Windows computer you are using during the guide from here.

There are two versions of the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge smartphone that have the SM-G9250 model number. The version that the rooting file in this guide is made for is the zeroltezc name. Do not install the file in this guide on the other name (zeroltezt) or else it will brick the smartphone.

You must have a computer that is running a version of the Windows operating system to use this guide.

The Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge smartphone must have the SM-G9250 model number to use this guide. Any other model number will get bricked because the CF-Auto-Root files are usually model number specific.

You should note that the CF-Auto-Root tool trips Samsung’s Knox security which is usually available from its most popular devices and flagship devices. You cannot get your warranty working again after Knox is tripped.

There may be some more Android updates that come the way of the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge smartphone, and the larger updates can sometimes bring new bootloaders with them. A new bootloader might sound like fun, but they can break the CF-Auto-Root tool temporarily until the developer fixes the issues. Some common problems people face when trying to root using a CF-Auto-Root tool that needs updating to compensate for a new bootloader include a device that will not boot after flashing or a device that will not flash. Period. Both of those problems can be fixed when Chainfire updates the files. For him to know what files to update, he asks people to leave the new recovery image file that is associated with your new firmware causing the issues to the official CF-AutoRoot thread made on the XDA-Developers website.

Rooting the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge SM-G9250 running on the Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow software updates

  1. Unlock the Developer Options menu on your Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge smartphone so you can use the list of options found inside.
  2. Enable the USB Debugging Mode on the S6 Edge smartphone by accessing the Developer Options menu that you just unlocked.
  3. Run the Samsung USB Drivers on the PC you are using so your device can be detected and connected to the computer and its apps.
  4. Extract the rooting package to the desktop of the computer so you can see the files inside, including the flashing app and the rooting exploit that will now be on your desktop as separate files.
  5. Double-click the Odin executable file that is on the desktop and runs the flashing tool with the Odin user interface open on the desktop.
  6. Pick up the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge smartphone and press the Power button, followed by the option to switch the device completely off from the menu.
  7. Once you know the phone is off, hold down the hardware button combination for the download mode.
  8. Press the Volume Up button when it says to do so on the device’s display, and you will be in the download mode ready to connect to the computer.
  9. Connect the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge smartphone to the computer with the USB cable and then wait for a few seconds before you do anything else.
  10. Since you waited some seconds, look for a yellow or blue ID: COM port coming from the Odin user interface and for the app to also give you an added message. (These details from the Odin user interface are letting you know that your smartphone is connected properly and you have the Samsung drivers working. Those who have installed the drivers as requested above but cannot get it to work might need to log out and in of the account or reboot the computer to get it working).
  11. Do not change any of the default settings from the Odin user interface.
  12. Click the AP button from the Odin user interface and then browse the desktop path to upload your rooting file that is currently on the desktop ending in the tar.md5 file extension.
  13. Click the Start button from the Odin user interface and then pick up your phone.
  14. Check that you see text rolling sown the screen that says your device is getting the SuperSU installed, the cache partition cleaned and the stock recovery flashed again.
  15. Check the Odin user interface on the computer for a pass message that will then present itself inside a green box.

In conclusion, that is how to root the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge smartphone with the SM-G9250 model number when you have running on the Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow software updates by using newer versions of the CF-Auto-Root tool by the same old developer, Chainfire.

Anyone looking for proof to see if the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge smartphone is rooted can install the root checker app from the Google Play Store and then open it up from the app drawer and follow a few brief instructions to check. You will find that there is a free version of the root checker application available for everyone to install from the Play Store and it is all you need to know if the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge smartphone is rooted or not. There is also a root checker pro app that is a paid version and for just a few dollars you can use some additional features including the ability to check whether or not you have BusyBox installed. The BusyBox app is one of the most popular root apps in all of history but isn’t considered anywhere near as vital as it once was.

Anyone who is using the root checker app and has found out the smartphone is not yet rooted can try booting the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge phone into the recovery mode as soon as the flashing completes. Chainfire says that a device has to be getting into the recovery mode for the SUperSu to be installed and enabled properly. However, it doesn’t matter if you do it manually. The CF-Auto-Root tool is programmed to handle it automatically during the rooting process, but it doesn’t always work which is why some people have ti handle it manually instead.

Once you have established that the recovery mode isn’t where your problem lies, try installing one of the other versions of the Odin application. We have a page that is dedicated to the Odin application, and you can install any versions of the Odin flashing app on your computer, and they will all work just the same to root the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge smartphone. There is enough evidence online to suggest that not every device works perfectly with every version of Odin, so even though Chainfire does the right thing and packages the latest versions of the Odin flashing tool in with his rooting bundle, it doesn’t mean that it will work for each device.




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